About me and my music.........

I'm a life-long Connecticut resident. I received my degree in Composition from the University of Bridgeport where I studied with David Barnett and Michael Linton. My instrument is the accordion ---- yes, the accordion. 

I have great memories of my accordion career. It afforded me the opportunity to concertize and compete throughout the world. A Bronze Medal in Auckland and a Gold in Hamburg were definitely highlights. But I'd have to say my fondest memories come from my 3 solo concerts at Carnegie Hall. It was quite a thrill. Playing and traveling also gave me opportunities as a composer, with a number of my works being performed in various venues by myself and my colleagues in the accordion world.

The accordion also allowed me to meet and work with Frank Porto. He was a teacher, mentor, friend and second father to me. Without his inspiration, dedication and support, I would have likely gone down a different path with my music. He helped open my musical world well beyond the accordion and gave me the drive to pursue the many different tracks my musical journey has followed.

My compositional style follows no particular school of writing. During my college years, if asked, I would quickly and proudly say that my music was atonal. Now, with the wisdom of age, and the benefit of much more study, I know how wrong that was. Much of my music is far from atonal in the Schoenberg, Webern, Berg sense. I believe very strongly in melody and the subsequent development of melody as a compositional force. Though my melodic ideas are rarely hummable tunes, I still maintain a commitment to the ideas and to their development as a unifying tool in my works. I also strive for a harmonic consistency throughout a given piece. I tend to view my harmonic content as a flirtation with poly-tonality, not in the conventional sense which has 2 tonalities working in concert, but more in a contrapuntal sense where 2 independent tonalities happen to be sounding simultaneously but without a dependency on each other. With dissonance being a common link in most of my harmonic structures, the degree of dissonance will change from piece to piece depending on the topic. In layman's terms, some pieces are uglier and/or darker than others. Of course ugliness, beauty, dark, light, like, dislike --- these are very subjective concepts which I try to eliminate from my thinking when composing. My music lives in the world of tritones and augmented fifths, using "less dissonant" as my points of relaxation. But I still try to strike a balance between tension and resolution towards the goal of creating an emotion, a picture, an idea or a feeling through the music. In the end, I wish only to touch the soul of the listener; to make them feel something through the music.    

I hope you listen and enjoy. And please, drop me a note and let me know what you think........